Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Jeanne C. Chambers; Matthew L. Brooks; Kent Turner; Carol B. Raish; Steven M. Ostoja
    Date: 2013
    Source: In: Chambers, Jeanne C.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Pendleton, Burton K.; Raish, Carol B., eds. The Southern Nevada Agency Partnership Science and Research Synthesis: Science to support land management in Southern Nevada. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-303. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 1-15.
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (1.46 MB)

    Description

    Southern Nevada is characterized by an arid to semi-arid environment with numerous cultural resources and a high level of biological diversity. Since 1980, the human population of the region has increased at unprecedented rates largely due to the expansion of suburban areas (Hughson 2009). The various human activities associated with this growth and the interactions of those activities with the generally dry and highly variable climate result in numerous stresses to ecosystems, species, and cultural resources. In addition, climate models predict that the rate of temperature increase and, thus, changes in ecological processes, will be highest for ecosystems with low topographic variability including deserts like the Mojave (Loarie and others 2009). These stresses vary in scale and can be characterized as global (e.g., large scale climatic processes and fluctuations), regional (e.g., atmospheric pollution sources from the southwest), and local (e.g., land use practices) (Fenstermaker and others 2009; Chapter 2). Although global and regional stresses have long-term and lasting effects, local stresses are often the most apparent. Human development in the region is increasing the number of roads and utility corridors, resulting in dust generation and desert trash, and causing an expansion of recreational activities. Past and present grazing by livestock, wild horses, and burros is having widespread effects on native vegetation. The spread of invasive non-native plants is altering fire regimes and causing the conversion of native ecosystems to invasive plant dominance. Groundwater pumping and water diversions coupled with invasive aquatic organisms are degrading many of the region’s spring, stream, and riparian ecosystems. The cumulative effects of these stresses are placing the region’s cultural and biological resources at risk, and causing the loss of habitat for the region’s native plant and animal species. There are multiple species of concern in the region, 17 of which are already listed as threatened. Maintaining and restoring the complex variety of ecosystems and resources that occur in southern Nevada in the face of such rapid socio-economic and ecological change presents numerous challenges to Federal land managers.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Chambers, Jeanne C.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Turner, Kent; Raish, Carol B.; Ostoja, Steven M. 2013. An overview of the Southern Nevada Agency Partnership Science and Research Synthesis [Chapter 1]. In: Chambers, Jeanne C.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Pendleton, Burton K.; Raish, Carol B., eds. The Southern Nevada Agency Partnership Science and Research Synthesis: Science to support land management in Southern Nevada. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-303. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 1-15.

    Keywords

    Mojave, Great Basin, anthropogenic disturbance, climate change, invasive species, altered fire regimes, water resources, species of conservation concern, restoration, heritage resources, recreation, ecosystem resilience, science-based management

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/44300