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National wildlife refuge management on the United States/Mexico border

Author(s):

William R. Radke

Year:

2013

Publication type:

Proceedings (P)

Primary Station(s):

Rocky Mountain Research Station

Source:

In: Gottfried, Gerald J.; Ffolliott, Peter F.; Gebow, Brooke S.; Eskew, Lane G.; Collins, Loa C. Merging science and management in a rapidly changing world: Biodiversity and management of the Madrean Archipelago III and 7th Conference on Research and Resource Management in the Southwestern Deserts; 2012 May 1-5; Tucson, AZ. Proceedings. RMRS-P-67. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 5-9.

Description

Many conservation strategies have been developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in cooperation with others to protect habitat and enhance the recovery of fish and wildlife populations in the San Bernardino Valley, which straddles Arizona, United States, and Sonora, Mexico. Habitats along this international border have been impacted by illegal activities, frustrating recovery of rare species. In addition, potential threats to national security have prompted the United States to aggressively control the country’s boundaries, thus creating additional challenges for land managers mandated with protecting the nation’s landscapes, natural resources, and associated values. Such challenges are not insurmountable and, with focused coordination, resource management and border security can be achieved and can often compliment one another. With or without the influence of changes along the international border, an effective species recovery strategy must include a coordinated approach that involves assessing the biological requirements of selected species through combinations of inventory, monitoring, and research activities; managing and protecting existing and historic habitats and populations; assessing potential reintroductions of key species into appropriate habitats where feasible; managing exotic plants and animals that threaten the recovery of desired conditions; and providing outreach and education relative to the species, their habitats, and the ecosystems upon which all fish, wildlife, and humans depend.

Citation

Radke, William R. 2013. National wildlife refuge management on the United States/Mexico border. In: Gottfried, Gerald J.; Ffolliott, Peter F.; Gebow, Brooke S.; Eskew, Lane G.; Collins, Loa C. Merging science and management in a rapidly changing world: Biodiversity and management of the Madrean Archipelago III and 7th Conference on Research and Resource Management in the Southwestern Deserts; 2012 May 1-5; Tucson, AZ. Proceedings. RMRS-P-67. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 5-9.

Publication Notes

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/44405