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    Author(s): D. J. Weber; B. Gul; A. Khan; T. Williams; N. Williams; P. Wayman; S. Warner
    Date: 2001
    Source: In: McArthur, E. Durant; Fairbanks, Daniel J., comps. Shrubland ecosystem genetics and biodiversity: proceedings; 2000 June 13-15; Provo, UT. Proc. RMRS-P-21. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 287-290.
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (72.87 KB)

    Description

    Of the world’s land area, about 7 percent is salt affected. Irrigated land is more susceptible to salinity and it is estimated that over 1/3 of the irrigated soils are becoming saline. Certain plants (halophytes) grow well on high saline soils. One approach would be to grow halophytes on high saline soils and harvest their seeds. The oil in the seeds would be extracted for cooking oil. The amount of unsaturated fatty acids is a measure of the quality of cooking oil. High-unsaturated fatty acid content is considered a factor in preventing heart diseases. Seeds of seven halophytic shrubs were extracted and the oil was analyzed for fatty acids using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The average unsaturation for the fatty acids in the seed oil was 84 percent, which is a favorable percent. The major saturated fatty acid was Hexadecanoic acid. There were several dominant unsaturated fatty acids namely: 9,12- Octadecadienoic acid, 13-Octadecenoic acid, 11-Eicosenoic acid, 9,12,15, Octadecatrienoic acid, and 9-Octadecenoic acid. It appears that these halophytes have potential for reclaiming and utilizing saline soil.

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    Citation

    Weber, D. J.; Gul, B.; Khan, A.; Williams, T.; Williams, N.; Wayman, P.; Warner, S. 2001. Composition of vegetable oil from seeds of native halophytes. In: McArthur, E. Durant; Fairbanks, Daniel J., comps. Shrubland ecosystem genetics and biodiversity: proceedings; 2000 June 13-15; Provo, UT. Proc. RMRS-P-21. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 287-290.

    Keywords

    wildland shrubs, genetics, biodiversity, disturbance, ecophysiology, community ecology

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