Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Steven N. Jeffers; Inga M. Meadows; Joseph B. James; Paul H. Sisco
    Date: 2012
    Source: In: Sniezko, Richard A.; Yanchuk, Alvin D.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M.; Alexander, Janice M.; Frankel, Susan J., tech. coords. Proceedings of the fourth international workshop on the genetics of host-parasite interactions in forestry: Disease and insect resistance in forest trees. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-240. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. pp. 194-195
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (185.52 KB)

    Description

    American chestnut (Castanea dentata (Marsh.) Borkh.) once was a primary hardwood species in forests of the eastern United States. Sometime during the late 18th century, it is speculated that Phytophthora cinnamomi, which causes Phytophthora root rot (PRR) on many woody plant species, was introduced to the southeast region of the United States, and this pathogen spread as people moved inland from the coast (Zentmyer 1980). In the 1800s, PRR (also known as ink disease) caused extensive mortality to American chestnut trees in the southern portion of its range (Freinkel 2007, Zentmyer 1980). Then, in the early 1900s, chestnut blight, caused by Cryphonectria parasitica, almost eliminated American chestnut trees from eastern forests (Freinkel 2007). Since 1989, The American Chestnut Foundation (TACF) has been producing hybrid chestnut seedlings by crossing Chinese chestnut (C. mollissima), which is resistant to C. parasitica, with American chestnut and then backcrossing progeny to C. dentata to produce resistant American-type chestnut trees. Since 2000, hybrid seedlings planted in some locations in southeastern states have died from PRR before they could be challenged by naturally-occurring populations of C. parasitica. Therefore, we wanted to determine if any of the backcross trees selected for resistance to C. parasitica were resistant to P. cinnamomi as well because Chinese chestnut also is resistant to this pathogen.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to psw_communications@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Jeffers, Steven N.; Meadows, Inga M.; James, Joseph B.; Sisco, Paul H. 2012. Resistance to Phytophthora cinnamomi among seedlings from backcross families of hybrid american chestnut. In: Sniezko, Richard A.; Yanchuk, Alvin D.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M.; Alexander, Janice M.; Frankel, Susan J., tech. coords. Proceedings of the fourth international workshop on the genetics of host-parasite interactions in forestry: Disease and insect resistance in forest trees. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-240. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. pp. 194-195.

    Keywords

    forest disease and insect resistance, evolutionary biology, climate change, durable resistance

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/44905