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Effects of salvage logging and pile-and-burn on fuel loading, potential fire behaviour, fuel consumption and emissions

Author(s):

Jessica E. Halofsky

Year:

2013

Publication type:

Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Primary Station(s):

Pacific Northwest Research Station

Source:

International Journal of Wildland Fire. 22: 757-769

Description

We used a combination of field measurements and simulation modelling to quantify the effects of salvage logging, and a combination of salvage logging and pile-and-burn fuel surface fuel treatment (treatment combination), on fuel loadings, fire behaviour, fuel consumption and pollutant emissions at three points in time: post-windstorm (before salvage logging), post-salvage logging and post-surface fuel treatment (pile-and-burn). Salvage logging and the treatment combination significantly reduced fuel loadings, fuelbed depth and smoke emissions. Salvage logging and the treatment combination reduced total surface fuel loading (sound plus rotten) by 73 and 77%. All fine woody fuels (<7.6 cm) were significantly reduced by salvage logging and the treatment combination. In contrast, there was significant increase in the 1000-h (7.6-22.9 cm) fuel loading. Salvage logging and the treatment combination reduced mean fuelbed depth by 38 and 65%. Salvage logging reduced PM2.5 emissions by 19%, and the treatment combination reduced emissions by 27%. Salvage logging and the treatment combination reduced PM10 emissions by 19 and 28%. We observed monotonic changes in flame length, reaction intensity and rate-of-spread after salvage logging and treatment combination. Study results illustrate potential differences between the effects of salvage logging after windstorms and the effects of salvage logging after wildfire.

Citation

Johnson, Morris C.; Halofsky, Jessica E.; Peterson, David L. 2013. Effects of salvage logging and pile-and-burn on fuel loading, potential fire behaviour, fuel consumption and emissions. International Journal of Wildland Fire. 22: 757-769.

Publication Notes

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/45343