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    Author(s): Gordon H. Reeves
    Date: 2013
    Source: In: Anderson, P.D.; Ronnenberg, K.L., eds. Density management in the 21st century: west side story. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-880. Portland, OR: US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station: 203-203.
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Northwest Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (74.56 KB)

    Description

    Resource managers are increasingly required to conduct integrated analyses of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems before undertaking any activities. Th ere are a number of research studies on the impacts of management actions on these ecosystems, as well as a growing body of knowledge about ecological processes that aff ect them, particularly aquatic ecosystems, which are used to guide the analyses. Additionally, new tools are available to assist in the analyses. These developments have advanced the potential to conduct these analyses. However, there are some critical issues that need to be included in an integrated analysis that are not readily recognized or acknowledged at this time. Two of the more important factors are space and dynamics. Watershed and landscape analyses require consideration of a diff erent set of rules for considering context and potential eff ects of proposed actions than do analyses that are conducted at smaller scales. The failure to recognize these issues can result in a misinterpretation of the analyses and a failure to understand potential impacts. Watershed analysis also focuses on identifying the location of, and accessing the magnitude of, various ecological processes in the watershed. Consideration of the dynamic nature of processes that affect aquatic ecosystems is relatively new, but the implications of these dynamics are not fully recognized by many managers and regulators. In consequence of both these factors, there is a mismatch between the expectations for management of aquatic and terrestrial systems and the way in which these systems actually function that limits our ability to develop and implement new approaches to integrated management.

    Publication Notes

    • Visit PNW's Publication Request Page to request a hard copy of this publication.
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    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Reeves, Gordon H. 2013. Integrated watershed analysis: adapting to changing times. In: Anderson, P.D.; Ronnenberg, K.L., eds. Density management in the 21st century: west side story. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-880. Portland, OR: US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station: 203-203.

    Keywords

    integrated ecosystem analysis, temporal and spatial scale, dynamic systems, management expectations

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