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Outplanting [Chapter 17]

Author(s):

Diane L. Haase
Thomas D. Landis

Year:

2014

Publication type:

Agricultural Handbook

Primary Station(s):

Rocky Mountain Research Station

Historical Station(s):

Washington Office

Source:

In: Wilkinson, Kim M.; Landis, Thomas D.; Haase, Diane L.; Daley, Brian F.; Dumroese, R. Kasten, eds. Tropical Nursery Manual: A guide to starting and operating a nursery for native and traditional plants. Agriculture Handbook 732. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. p. 313-337.

Description

Survival and growth after outplanting are the ultimate tests of nursery plant quality. After the nursery plants are established in the field, they will provide many benefits to the environment by improving soil quality, enhancing biodiversity, inhibiting establishment of invasive plants, sequestering carbon, restoring native plant populations, providing windbreaks, creating wildlife habitat, and preventing soil erosion. In addition, established native and traditional plants can provide food, fuel, medicines, crafts, animal fodder, beautification, and many other benefits. Careful planning well in advance is important with attention to the eight steps of the Target Plant Concept. In addition, care with site preparation, onsite plant handling, selection of planting spots, proper planting techniques, support and protection of seedlings, and quality control during the outplanting process all help ensure the plants will have the best chance to survive. Long-term monitoring by the client and follow up with the nursery can help refine target plant requirements and improve future project successes.

Citation

Haase, Diane L.; Landis, Thomas D.; Dumroese, R. Kasten. 2014. Outplanting [Chapter 17]. In: Wilkinson, Kim M.; Landis, Thomas D.; Haase, Diane L.; Daley, Brian F.; Dumroese, R. Kasten, eds. Tropical Nursery Manual: A guide to starting and operating a nursery for native and traditional plants. Agriculture Handbook 732. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. p. 313-337.

Publication Notes

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