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    Author(s): Stephanie LaseterChelcy MiniatJames Vose
    Date: 2014
    Source: In: McDonald, Babs; Nickelsen, Jessica; Dobish, Julia; Riley, Elissa; Andrews, Michelle; Melear-Daniels, Emily, production staff. Natural IQ: Investigating questions about climate. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-GTR-183. Asheville, NC. USDA-Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 27-41 p.
    Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
    Station: Southern Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (10.53 MB)

    Description

    Climate change can have a direct and indirect impacts on water resources. Direct impacts of climate change can be seen by the presence of more extreme weather events. Extreme weather events include things like heat waves and droughts. Droughts have a direct impact on water and water supply. The indirect impacts of climate change on water resources relate to temperature and the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

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    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Laseter, Stephanie, Miniat Chelcy Ford, Vose, James. 2014. Flow Down! Can managing forests help maintain water supplies in the face of climate change? In: McDonald, Babs; Nickelsen, Jessica; Dobish, Julia; Riley, Elissa; Andrews, Michelle; Melear-Daniels, Emily, production staff. Natural IQ: Investigating questions about climate. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-GTR-183. Asheville, NC. USDA-Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 27-41 p.

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