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    Author(s): Sally Duncan
    Date: 2000
    Source: Science Findings. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. January (21): 1-5
    Publication Series: Science Findings
    Station: Pacific Northwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (279.0 KB)

    Description

    What are the best alternatives for easing conflict among aesthetics, economic values, and sustained wood production of responsible timber harvesting? How can forest managers craft options across a landscape for a mix of values and forest conditions? In part, with an understanding of the interactions of sustained timber production, wildlife habitat, and aesthetics.

    This issue of Science Findings examines a joint research project being conducted by the PNW Research Station and the Washington Department of Natural Resources on highly productive, predominate Douglas-fir land in the 90,000-acre Capitol Forest near Olympia, Washington.

    Scientists developed six biologically and operationally reasonable options to study: clearcut, extended rotation without thinning,retained overstory, small patch cutting, group selection, and extended rotation with commercial thinning. One key finding to emerge early from the study is that foresters, environmentalists, tree farmers, and nonforestry undergraduate students view the aesthetics of many silvicultural practices similarly. The differences of opinion among these groups are mostly in the degree to which they like or dislike a particular practice.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to pnw_pnwpubs@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Duncan, Sally. 2000. Developing new silvicultural regimes: the eyes have it. Science Findings. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. January (21): 1-5

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