Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Peter Z. Fule; Charles McHugh; Thomas A. Heinlein; W. Wallace Covington
    Date: 2001
    Source: In: Vance, Regina K.; Edminster, Carleton B.; Covington, W. Wallace; Blake, Julie A., comps. Ponderosa pine ecosystems restoration and conservation: steps toward stewardship; 2000 April 25-27; Flagstaff, AZ. Proceedings RMRS-P-22. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 28-35.
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (90.57 KB)

    Description

    Potential fire behavior was compared under dry, windy weather conditions in 12 ponderosa pine stands treated with alternative thinning prescriptions in the wildland/urban interface of Flagstaff, Arizona. Prior to thinning, stands averaged 474 trees/ acre, 158 ft2/acre basal area, crown bulk density 0.0045 lb/ft3, and crown base height 19.2 ft. Three thinning treatments differing in residual tree density were applied to each of three stands (total of nine treated, three control). Treatments were based on historic forest structure prior to Euro-American settlement and disruption of the frequent fire regime (circa 1876). Thinning reduced stand densities 77-88 percent, basal areas 35-66 percent, crown bulk densities 24-48 percent, and raised crown base height an average of 11 ft. Before thinning, simulated fire behavior under the 97th percentile of June fire weather conditions was predicted to be intense but controllable (5.4 ft flame lengths). However, active or passive crownfires were simulated using crown base heights in the lowest quintile (20 percent) or winds gusting to 30 mph, representing the fuel ladders and wind gusts that are important for initiating crown burning. Under the identical conditions after thinning, all three treatments resisted crown burning. The degree of resistance was related to thinning intensity. It is crucial to remove thinning slash fuels through prescribed burning or other means. If not removed, slash fuels can cause crownfire behavior in the thinned stands under severe wildfire conditions. Finally, the crownfire resistance achieved through thinning will deteriorate over time unless maintenance burning and/or thinning is continued.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Fule, Peter Z.; McHugh, Charles; Heinlein, Thomas A.; Covington, W. Wallace. 2001. Potential fire behavior is reduced following forest restoration treatments. In: Vance, Regina K.; Edminster, Carleton B.; Covington, W. Wallace; Blake, Julie A., comps. Ponderosa pine ecosystems restoration and conservation: steps toward stewardship; 2000 April 25-27; Flagstaff, AZ. Proceedings RMRS-P-22. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 28-35.

    Keywords

    ponderosa pine, ecosystem management, landscape management, restoration, conservation, fire behavior, cost effectiveness analysis

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/46668