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    Author(s): Fiona Brock; Joanna Ostapkowicz; Christopher Bronk Ramsey; Alex Wiedenhoeft; Caroline Cartwright
    Date: 2012
    Source: In: Proceedings of the 6th international radiocarbon and archaeology symposium, edited by E. Boaretto and N.R. Rebollo Franco. Radiocarbon Volume 54, Volume 3/4, 2013; pp. 677-688.
    Publication Series: Full Proceedings
    Station: Forest Products Laboratory
    PDF: Download Publication  (343.86 KB)

    Description

    Radiocarbon dating of historical and archaeological wood can be complicated, sometimes involving issues of “inbuilt” age in slow-growing woods, and/or the possibility of reuse or long delays between felling and use of the wood. Terminus dates can be provided by dating the sapwood, or the outermost edge of heartwood, while a date from the pith can give an indication of the first years of growth. A sequence of samples from specific points within the bole can be used to determine the growth rate of the tree. Such a combined dating strategy is particularly useful in cross-referencing dates from a single piece, better placing it in its chronological context. This paper reports paired or multiple dates from 11 wooden sculptures dated as part of the Pre-Hispanic Caribbean Sculptural Arts in Wood project, which studied 66 wooden artifacts attributed to the pre-colonial Taíno, the indigenous peoples of the Caribbean’s Greater Antilles. The calibrated ages of the pieces published here range from ~AD 700–1500, indicating that the Taíno were producing elaborate sculptures much earlier than previously thought. The paired or multiple dates from these carvings confirmed the accuracy of the results, and were also used to construct a growth rate model of what was expected to be a slow-growing species (Guaiacum sp.). This model demonstrates that the boles used to create the sculptures grew on average 1 cm every 6–13 yr.

    Publication Notes

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    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Brock, Fiona; Ostapkowicz, Joanna; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Wiedenhoeft, Alex; Cartwright, Caroline. 2012. Paired dating of pith and outer edge (terminus) samples from prehispanic Caribbean wooden sculptures. In: Proceedings of the 6th international radiocarbon and archaeology symposium, edited by E. Boaretto and N.R. Rebollo Franco. Radiocarbon Volume 54, Volume 3/4, 2013; pp. 677-688.

    Keywords

    Taino, radiocarbon dating, growth modeling, guaiacum

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/46747