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    Author(s): Alan E. Watson; H. Ken Cordell
    Date: 2014
    Source: International Journal of Wilderness. 20(2): 14-19, 33.
    Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (218.07 KB)

    Description

    Wilderness social science has changed over the 50 years since passage of the Wilderness Act. This research was initially heavily influenced by the need to operationalize definitions contained in the Wilderness Act, the desire to report use levels, and the need for better understanding of the important values American people attached to wilderness. Over the past three decades, however, wilderness science was guided by new questions asked by managers due to changes in society, technology, and use patterns. Scientists have collaborated with managers to provide solutions to changing science needs and changing relationships between the U.S. population and wilderness. This article summarizes these changes and highlights contributions to wilderness and other protected area management solutions.

    Publication Notes

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    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Watson, Alan E.; Cordell, H. Ken. 2014. Wilderness social science responding to change in society, policy, and the environment. International Journal of Wilderness. 20(2): 14-19, 33.

    Keywords

    wilderness social science, change

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