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    Author(s): Scott L. Stephens; Neil Burrows; Alexander Buyantuyev; Robert W. Gray; Robert E. Keane; Rick Kubian; Shirong Liu; Francisco Seijo; Lifu Shu; Kevin G. Tolhurst; Jan W. van Wagtendonk
    Date: 2014
    Source: Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. 12: 115-122.
    Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (925.83 KB)

    Description

    Mega-fires are often defined according to their size and intensity but are more accurately described by their socioeconomic impacts. Three factors - climate change, fire exclusion, and antecedent disturbance, collectively referred to as the "mega-fire triangle" - likely contribute to today's mega-fires. Some characteristics of mega-fires may emulate historical fire regimes and can therefore sustain healthy fire-prone ecosystems, but other attributes decrease ecosystem resiliency. A good example of a program that seeks to mitigate mega-fires is located in Western Australia, where prescribed burning reduces wildfire intensity while conserving ecosystems. Crown-fire-adapted ecosystems are likely at higher risk of frequent mega-fires as a result of climate change, as compared with other ecosystems once subject to frequent less severe fires. Fire and forest managers should recognize that mega-fires will be a part of future wildland fire regimes and should develop strategies to reduce their undesired impacts.

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    Citation

    Stephens, Scott L.; Burrows, Neil; Buyantuyev, Alexander; Gray, Robert W.; Keane, Robert E.; Kubian, Rick; Liu, Shirong; Seijo, Francisco; Shu, Lifu; Tolhurst, Kevin G.; van Wagtendonk, Jan W. 2014. Temperate and boreal forest mega-fires: characteristics and challenges. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. 12: 115-122.

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    Keywords

    mega-fires, mega-fire triangle, climate change, fire exclusion, antecedent disturbance, wildland fire

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