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Long-term response of yellow-poplar to thinning in the Southern Appalachian Mountains

Author(s):

Peter M. Brown

Year:

2015

Publication type:

General Technical Report (GTR)

Primary Station(s):

Southern Research Station

Source:

In Proceedings of the 17th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e–Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–203. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 3 p.

Description

Yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) is the most abundant individual tree species (in terms of volume) in the southern Appalachian Mountains, with Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) reports documenting a continuous increase in yellow-poplar over the recent years (Brown 2003, Schweitzer 1999, Thompson 1998). Current management efforts in evenaged yellow-poplar stands rarely include thinning operations. However, thinning prescriptions largely driven by timber-related goals and objectives were once commonplace across the region.

Citation

Keyser, Tara L.; Brown, Peter M. 2015. Long-term response of yellow-poplar to thinning in the Southern Appalachian Mountains. In Proceedings of the 17th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e–Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–203. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 3 p.

Publication Notes

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  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/47527