Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Daniel J. IsaakMichael K. YoungDavid NagelDona Horan
    Date: 2014
    Source: In: Carline, R. F.; LoSapio, C., eds. Looking back and moving forward: Proceedings of the Wild Trout XI Symposium; Sept 22-25, 2014; West Yellowstone, MT. Bozeman, MT: Wild Trout Symposium. p. 110-116.
    Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (463.44 KB)

    Description

    Native trout are culturally and ecologically important, but also likely to undergo widespread declines as the coldwater environments they require continue to shrink in association with global warming. Much can be done to preserve these fish but efficient planning and targeting of conservations resources has been hindered by a lack of broad-scale datasets and precise information about which streams are most likely to support native trout populations later this century. Using accurate stream temperature climate scenarios developed in the NorWeST project, we identify stream habitats for native Cutthroat Trout Oncorhynchus clarkii and Bull Trout Salvelinus confluentus across northern Idaho and northwestern Montana that are cold enough to serve as climate refugia and resist invasions by nonnative trout. Climate-safe coldwater habitats for Cutthroat Trout in the historical scenario encompassed 7,547 – 16,821 stream kilometers (depending on the local co-occurrence of Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis) and 12,189 kilometers for Bull Trout. The majority of coldwater habitats (77%-88%) currently occur on federal lands, a pattern that will become even more pronounced late in the century if the projected 63%-82% declines in coldwater habitats occur. The information developed for this project, and accompanying geospatial databases, are also available for a much larger area across the northwest U.S. to assist managers in strategic decision making about where to allocate conservation resources to best preserve native trout.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Isaak, Daniel J.; Young, Michael K.; Nagel, David; Horan, Dona. 2014. Cold water as a climate shield to preserve native trout through the 21st Century. In: Carline, R. F.; LoSapio, C., eds. Looking back and moving forward: Proceedings of the Wild Trout XI Symposium; Sept 22-25, 2014; West Yellowstone, MT. Bozeman, MT: Wild Trout Symposium. p. 110-116.

    Keywords

    coldwater habitats, climate shield, native trout, Cutthroat Trout, Oncorhynchus clarkii, Bull Trout, Salvelinus confluentus, Brook Trout, Salvelinus fontinalis

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/47852