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    Author(s): Mark Knaebe
    Date: 2013
    Source: USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, FinishLine, 2013; 2 p.
    Publication Series: Finishlines
    Station: Forest Products Laboratory
    PDF: View PDF  (174.45 KB)

    Description

    Since the mid-1980s, a condition called “mill glaze” (also called planer’s glaze) has sometimes been blamed for the failure of a coating on smooth flat-grained siding and some other wood products. The exact cause of this problem has been a subject of controversy. Many people believe that the coating fails as a result of the planing and/or drying processes. They speculate that the milling or planing process overheats the wood and brings more water-soluble extractives to the surface, creating a hard varnishlike glaze. They attribute overheating to dull planer blades.

    Publication Notes

    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Knaebe, Mark 2013. Mill Glaze: Myth or Reality?. USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, FinishLine, 2013; 2 p.

    Keywords

    mill glaze, planing, surface roughness, surface quality, wood defects, finishes, sanding

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