Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Alan A. AgerJane L. HayesCraig L. Schmitt
    Date: 2004
    Source: In: Hayes, Jane L.; Ager, Alan. A.; Barbour, R. James, tech. eds. Methods for integrated modeling of landscape change: Interior Northwest Landscape Analysis System. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-610. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station: 104-116
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Northwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (102.88 KB)

    Description

    We describe methods for incorporating the effects of insects and diseases on coniferous forests into forest simulation models and discuss options for including this capability in the modeling work of the Interior Northwest Landscape Analysis System (INLAS) project. Insects and diseases are major disturbance agents in forested ecosystems in the Western United States, and over time, are responsible for major changes in forest composition and structure. Incorporating their effects into forest simulation models is difficult, especially the representation of large, episodic insect epidemics. Much empirical data on insect mortality is available for modelers, and an array of mortality models have been incorporated into indivdual tree growth simulators. Scaling these models to simulate epidemics on landscapes requires, among other things, parameters that describe the amplitudes and periodicities of pathogen/pest population cycles. Incorporating insect and disease effects into forest simulation models makes it possible to explore ways to minimize epidemic conifer mortality and secondary interactions with other disturbances. In addition, the inclusion of other resource goals and financial considerations makes it possible to analyze the costs and benefits of forest management activities that target stands with high risk of mortality. We discuss options for modeling insect and disease mortality within the INLAS project.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to pnw_pnwpubs@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Ager, Alan A.; Hayes, Jane L.; Schmitt, Craig L. 2004. Chapter 8: Simulating mortality from forest insects and diseases. In: Hayes, Jane L.; Ager, Alan. A.; Barbour, R. James, tech. eds. Methods for integrated modeling of landscape change: Interior Northwest Landscape Analysis System. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-610. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station: 104-116.

    Keywords

    Forest insects and diseases, forest stand simulation, tree mortality, landscape simulation.

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page