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    Author(s): Amy L. Ross-Davis; Rodrigo N. Graca; Acelino C. Alfenas; Tobin L. Peever; Jack W. Hanna; Janice Y. Uchida; Rob D. Hauff; Chris Y. Kadooka; Mee-Sook Kim; Phil G. Cannon; Shigetou Namba; Nami Minato; Sofia Simeto; Carlos A. Perez; Min B. Rayamajhi; Mauricio Moran; D. Jean Lodge; Marcela Arguedas; Rosario Medel-Ortiz; M. Armando Lopez-Ramirez; Paula Tennant; Morag Glen; Ned B. Klopfenstein
    Date: 2014
    Source: In: Chadwick, K.; Palacios, P., comps. Proceedings of the 61st Annual Western International Forest Disease Work Conference; October 6-11, 2013; Waterton Lakes National Park; AB, Canada. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Health Protection. p. 131-137.
    Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (3.0 MB)

    Description

    Puccinia psidii Winter (Basidiomycota, Uredinales) is a biotrophic rust fungus that was first reported in Brazil from guava in 1884 (Psidium guajava; Winter 1884) and later from eucalypt in 1912 (Joffily 1944). Considered to be of neotropical origin, the rust has also been reported to infect diverse myrtaceous hosts elsewhere in South America, Central America, the Caribbean, Mexico, the USA (California, Florida, and Hawaii), Japan, Australia, China, and most recently South Africa and New Caledonia (Figure 1; Maclachlan 1938, Marlatt and Kimbrough 1979, Mellano 2006, Uchida et al. 2006, Kawanishi et al. 2009, Carnegie et al. 2010, Perez et al. 2011, Zambino and Nolan 2011, Zhuang and Wei 2011, Roux et al. 2013, Rayamajhi et al. 2013). Given the rate at which the pathogen is spreading and its wide host range, the objectives of this study were to estimate genetic diversity within and among populations across the species native range as well as areas of recent introduction, evaluate possible pathways of spread, and predict geographic areas that are climatically suitable in order to predict risk of invasion.

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    Citation

    Ross-Davis, Amy L.; Graca, Rodrigo N.; Alfenas, Acelino C.; Peever, Tobin L.; Hanna, Jack W.; Uchida, Janice Y.; Hauff, Rob D.; Kadooka, Chris Y.; Kim, Mee-Sook; Cannon, Phil G.; Namba, Shigetou; Minato, Nami; Simeto, Sofia; Perez, Carlos A.; Rayamajhi, Min B.; Moran, Mauricio; Lodge, D. Jean; Arguedas, Marcela; Medel-Ortiz, Rosario; Lopez-Ramirez, M. Armando; Tennant, Paula; Glen, Morag; Klopfenstein, Ned B. 2014. Tracking the distribution of Puccinia psidii genotypes that cause rust disease on diverse myrtaceous trees and shrubs. In: Chadwick, K.; Palacios, P., comps. Proceedings of the 61st Annual Western International Forest Disease Work Conference; October 6-11, 2013; Waterton Lakes National Park; AB, Canada. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Health Protection. p. 131-137.

    Keywords

    Puccinia psidii, rust disease, myrtaceous trees and shrubs

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