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    Author(s): David E. Jennings; Jian J. Duan; Kristopher J. Abell; Leah S. Bauer; Juli R. Gould; Paula M. Shrewsbury; Roy G. Van Driesche
    Date: 2015
    Source: In: Van Driesche, R.G.; Reardon, R.C., eds. Biology and control of emerald ash borer. FHTET-2014-09. Morgantown, WV: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Health Technology Enterprise Team: 139-151. Chapter 9.
    Publication Series: Book Chapter
    Station: Northern Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (347.52 KB)

    Description

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (EAB), is an invasive buprestid native to northeastern Asia that feeds on ash trees (Fraxinus spp.). First detected in North America (in Michigan, United States and Ontario, Canada) in 2002, EAB has spread rapidly, in part because of movement of infested nursery stock and untreated firewood (Cappaert et al., 2005a; BenDor et al., 2006; Poland and McCullough, 2006). As of January 2014, EAB was known in an additional 21 U.S. states and one Canadian province (USDA-APHIS, 2014), and it is expected to continue spreading to other parts of the continent with ash trees and a suitable climate (Sobek-Swant et al., 2012; Vermunt et al., 2012; DeSantis et al., 2013). Thus far, EAB has killed tens of millions of ash trees, with tree death generally occurring within 3-4 years of initial infestation by the beetle (Poland and McCullough, 2006). The treatment, or removal and replacement of landscape trees affected by this pest is projected to cost over $10 billion in the United States in the coming decade (Kovacs et al., 2010). While insecticide treatments can be effective at reducing losses from EAB in urban settings, biological control might represent the most sustainable option for suppressing populations at the landscape level and in natural environments over the long term.

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    Citation

    Jennings, David E.; Duan, Jian J.; Abell, Kristopher J.; Bauer, Leah S.; Gould, Juli R.; Shrewsbury, Paula M.; Van Driesche, Roy G. 2015. Life table evaluation of change in emerald ash borer populations due to biological control. In: Van Driesche, R.G.; Reardon, R.C., eds. Biology and control of emerald ash borer. FHTET-2014-09. Morgantown, WV: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Health Technology Enterprise Team: 139-151. Chapter 9.

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