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    Author(s): Felicia D. Archuleta
    Date: 2014
    Source: Las Vegas, NM: New Mexico Highlands University. 90 p. Thesis.
    Publication Series: Theses
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (2.7 MB)

    Description

    Fragmentation of the landscape, habitat loss, and fire suppression, all a result of European settlement and activities, have precipitated both the decline of Black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) populations and the occurrence of fire throughout the Great Plains, including the Shortgrass steppe of northeastern New Mexico. The presence of Black-tailed prairie dogs, a keystone species, and the occurrence of fire both play a vital role in maintaining the integrity and diversity of grassland ecosystems. In addition to serving as prey for the endangered Black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes), Black-tailed prairie dogs conspicuously alter grassland landscapes and provide foraging, shelter, and nesting habitat for a diverse array of grassland species.

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    Citation

    Archuleta, Felicia D. 2014. Black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) response to seasonality and frequency of fire. Las Vegas, NM: New Mexico Highlands University. 90 p. Thesis.

    Keywords

    Black-tailed prairie dog, Cynomys ludovicianus, habitat, population decline, restoration

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