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    Author(s): Kevin Ford; Joshua H. Ness; Judith L. Bronstein; William F. Morris
    Date: 2015
    Source: Oecologia. 179(2): 435-446
    Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
    Station: Pacific Northwest Research Station
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    Description

    The impact of mutualists on a partner’s demography depends on how they affect the partner’s multiple vital rates and how those vital rates, in turn, affect population growth. However, mutualism studies rarely measure effects on multiple vital rates or integrate them to assess the ultimate impact on population growth. We used vital rate data, population models and simulations of long-term population dynamics to quantify the demographic impact of a guild of ant species on the plant Ferocactus wislizeni. The ants feed at the plant’s extrafloral nectaries and attack herbivores attempting to consume reproductive organs. Ant-guarded plants produced significantly more fruit, but ants had no significant effect on individual growth or survival. After integrating ant effects across these vital rates, we found that projected population growth was not significantly different between unguarded and ant-guarded plants because population growth was only weakly influenced by differences in fruit production (though strongly influenced by differences in individual growth and survival). However, simulations showed that ants could positively affect longterm plant population dynamics through services provided during rare but important events (herbivore outbreaks that reduce survival or years of high seedling recruitment associated with abundant precipitation). Thus, in this seemingly clear example of mutualism, the interaction may actually yield no clear benefit to plant population growth, or if it does, may only do so through the actions of the ants during rare events. These insights demonstrate the value of taking a demographic approach to studying the consequences of mutualism.

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    Citation

    Ford, Kevin R.; Ness, Joshua H.; Bronstein, Judith L.; Morris, William F. 2015. The demographic consequences of mutualism: ants increase host-plant fruit production but not population growth. Oecologia. 179(2): 435-446.

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    Keywords

    Ant plant, Cactus demography, Integral projection model, Protection mutualism, Sonoran Desert

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