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    Author(s): Dale R. Larson
    Date: 2002
    Source: In: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-56. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. p. 62-63
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (11 KB)

    Description

    The difficulty in establishing stands of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) by artificial regeneration techniques has been a major factor in the decline of the number of acres occupied by this species in the Southeast. Many landowners and managers have been reluctant to plant longleaf because of its history of poor survival. Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm.) now occupy many sites that longleaf pine dominated in the past. A renewed interest in longleaf regeneration has been developed in the past several years, and a substantial number of acres are now being reforested with longleaf pine. Research, development of containerized longleaf pine seedlings, and improved management practices have done a lot to eliminate most of the difficulties encountered in artificially regenerating longleaf pine stands.

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    Citation

    Larson, Dale R. 2002. Field Planting Containerized Longleaf Pine Seedlings. In: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-56. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. p. 62-63

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