Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Ziv Attia; Jean-Christophe Domec; Ram Oren; Danielle A. Way; Menachem Moshelion
    Date: 2015
    Source: Journal of Experimental Botany
    Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
    Station: Southern Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (1.0 MB)

    Description

    Understanding how different plants prioritize carbon gain and drought vulnerability under a variable water supply is important for predicting which trees will maximize woody biomass production under different environmental conditions. Here, Populus balsamifera (BS, isohydric genotype), P. simonii (SI, previously uncharacterized stomatal behaviour), and their cross, P. balsamifera x simonii (BSxSI, anisohydric genotype) were studied to assess the physiological basis for biomass accumulation and water-use efficiency across a range of water availabilities. Under ample water, whole plant stomatal conductance (gs), transpiration (E), and growth rates were higher in anisohydric genotypes (SI and BSxSI) than in isohydric poplars (BS). Under drought, all genotypes regulated the leaf to stem water potential gradient via changes in gs, synchronizing leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf) and E: isohydric plants reduced Kleaf, gs, and E, whereas anisohydric genotypes maintained high Kleaf and E, which reduced both leaf and stem water potentials. Nevertheless, SI poplars reduced their plant hydraulic conductance (Kplant) during water stress and, unlike, BSxSI plants, recovered rapidly from drought. Low gs of the isohydric BS under drought reduced CO2 assimilation rates and biomass potential under moderate water stress. While anisohydric genotypes had the fastest growth under ample water and higher photosynthetic rates under increasing water stress, isohydric poplars had higher water-use efficiency. Overall, the results indicate three strategies for how closely related biomass species deal with water stress: survival-isohydric (BS), sensitive-anisohydric (BSxSI), and resilience-anisohydric (SI). Implications for woody biomass growth, water-use efficiency, and survival under variable environmental conditions are discussed.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to pubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Attia, Ziv; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Oren, Ram; Way, Danielle A.; Moshelion, Menachem 2015. Growth and physiological responses of isohydric and anisohydric poplars to drought. Journal of Experimental Botany. 66(14): 4373-4381. 9 p.  10.1093/jxb/erv195

    Cited

    Google Scholar

    Keywords

    Bioenergy, biomass, carbon, hydraulic conductance, stomata, transpiration

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page