Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Susan E. Meyer; Julie Beckstead; JanaLynn Pearce
    Date: 2016
    Source: In: Germino, Matthew J.; Chambers, Jeanne C.; Brown, Cynthia S, eds. 2016. Exotic brome-grasses in arid and semiarid ecosystems of the western US: Causes, consequences, and management implications. Springer: Series on Environmental Management. p. 193-221.
    Publication Series: Book Chapter
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (1.0 MB)

    Description

    Bromus tectorum L. (cheatgrass or downy brome) presents a rich resource for soil microorganisms because of its abundant production of biomass, seeds, and surface litter. Many of these organisms are opportunistic saprophytes, but several fungal species regularly found in B. tectorum stands function as facultative or obligate pathogens. These organisms interact dynamically with abiotic factors such as interannual variation in weather, with other soil microorganisms, with their hosts, and with each other to create spatially and temporally varying patterns of endemic or epidemic disease. Five principal soilborne pathogens, Ustilago bullata Berk. (head smut pathogen), Tilletia bromi (Brockm.) Nannf. (chestnut bunt pathogen), Pyrenophora semeniperda (Brittlebank and Adams) Shoemaker (black fingers of death pathogen), Fusarium Link sp. n. (Fusarium seed rot pathogen), and a new species in the Rutstroemiaceae (bleach blonde syndrome pathogen), are known to have sometimes major impacts on B. tectorum seed bank dynamics, seedling emergence, and seed production. These pathogens exhibit niche specialization, so that they are rarely in direct competition. They sometimes interact to increase the total impact on B. tectorum stand structure, which can result in stand failure or "die-off." Die-offs represent areas where B. tectorum has been controlled by natural processes, suggesting that these areas might be suitable targets for restoration. Naturally occurring fungal pathogens that can have a strong negative impact on B. tectorum success have also been considered as candidate organisms for B. tectorum biocontrol using an augmentative mycoherbicidal strategy.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Meyer, Susan E.; Beckstead, Julie; Pearce, JanaLynn. 2016. Community ecology of fungal pathogens on Bromus tectorum [Chapter 7]. In: Germino, Matthew J.; Chambers, Jeanne C.; Brown, Cynthia S, eds. 2016. Exotic brome-grasses in arid and semiarid ecosystems of the western US: Causes, consequences, and management implications. Springer: Series on Environmental Management. p. 193-221.

    Keywords

    biocontrol, epidemic disease, stand failure, seed bank dynamics, soilborne pathogen

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/50576