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    Author(s): Jesse L. Morris; R. Justin DeRose; Andrea R. Brunelle
    Date: 2015
    Source: Forest Ecosystems. 2: 35.
    Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (1.0 MB)

    Description

    In Western North America, increasing wildfire and outbreaks of native bark beetles have been mediated by warming climate conditions. Bioclimatic models forecast the loss of key high elevation species throughout the region. This study uses retrospective vegetation and fire history data to reconstruct the drivers of past disturbance and environmental change. Understanding the relationship among climate, antecedent disturbances, and the legacy effects of settlement-era logging can help identify the patterns and processes that create landscapes susceptible to bark beetle epidemics.

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    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Morris, Jesse L.; DeRose, R. Justin; Brunelle, Andrea R. 2015. Long-term landscape changes in a subalpine spruce-fir forest in central Utah, USA. Forest Ecosystems. 2: 35.

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    Keywords

    spruce beetle, climate change, dendroctonus, engelmann spruce, logging, western North America, wildfire

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