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Aggressive root pathogen Phellinus noxius and implications for western Pacific Islands

Author(s):

Sara M. Ashiglar
Phil G. Cannon

Year:

2015

Publication type:

Paper (invited, offered, keynote)

Primary Station(s):

Rocky Mountain Research Station

Source:

In: Murray, Michael; Palacios, Patsy, comps. Proceedings of the 62nd annual Western International Forest Disease Work Conference; September 8-12, 2014; Cedar City, Utah. p. 79-81.

Description

Phellinus noxius is an aggressive root rot pathogen affecting tropical and subtropical forests. Causing much damage in tropical Asia, Africa, Taiwan, Japan and the Pacific Islands, its wide host range encompasses more than 200 plant species representing 59 families (Ann et al. 2002). It can devastate agricultural plantations of tea, rubber, cocoa, avocados, and oil palm; tropical fruit trees such as longan, breadfruit, litchi, carambola, and loquat; timber trees including hoop pine (Araucaria), eucalypts, and mahogany (Swietenia); as well as many ornamental trees and woody shrubs. Also susceptible are woody fruit trees such as persimmon, peach, pear, plum and grapes cultivars (Ann et al. 2002, Brooks 2002, Sahashi et al. 2012). Some taxa including citrus cultivars show resistance to the disease (Ann et al. 2002). Impacts of the fungus on native forests are less known, though native species have been reported vulnerable (Brooks 2002). P. noxius appears to attack regardless of initial host health, and can maintain itself on dead host root tissue for years after it has killed its host.

Citation

Ashiglar, Sara M.; Cannon, Phil G.; Klopfenstein, Ned B. 2015. Aggressive root pathogen Phellinus noxius and implications for western Pacific Islands. In: Murray, Michael; Palacios, Patsy, comps. Proceedings of the 62nd annual Western International Forest Disease Work Conference; September 8-12, 2014; Cedar City, Utah. p. 79-81.

Publication Notes

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/50643