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Fine-scale variability of forest soil fungal communities in two contrasting habitat series in northern Idaho, USA identified with microbial metagenomics

Year:

2016

Publication type:

Paper (invited, offered, keynote)

Primary Station(s):

Rocky Mountain Research Station

Source:

In: Ramsey, Amy; Palacios, Patsy, comps. Proceedings of the 63rd Annual Western International Forest Disease Work Conference; September 21-25 , 2015; Newport, OR. Olympia, WA: Washington Department of Natural Resources; Logan, UT: Utah State University, Quinney College of Natural Resources. p. 145-149.

Description

Forests are home to some of the most complex microbial communities (Fierer et al. 2012) which drive biogeochemical cycles (Clemmensen et al. 2013; van der Heijden et al. 2008) and account for substantial terrestrial biomass (Nielsen et al. 2011). Fungi, through their ecological roles as decomposers, mutualists, or pathogens, are particularly important in breaking down organic matter and mediating plant nutrition. Despite this, little is known about the variability, composition, and structure of forest soil fungal communities (Tedersoo et al. 2014). In fact, much of global fungal diversity remains undocumented (Blackwell 2011; Hawksworth 2012).

Citation

Ross-Davis, Amy; Stewart, Jane E.; Settles, Matt; Hanna, John W.; Shaw, John D.; Hudak, Andrew T.; Page-Dumroese, Deborah S.; Klopfenstein, Ned B. 2016. Fine-scale variability of forest soil fungal communities in two contrasting habitat series in northern Idaho, USA identified with microbial metagenomics. In: Ramsey, Amy; Palacios, Patsy, comps. Proceedings of the 63rd Annual Western International Forest Disease Work Conference; September 21-25 , 2015; Newport, OR. Olympia, WA: Washington Department of Natural Resources; Logan, UT: Utah State University, Quinney College of Natural Resources. p. 145-149.

Publication Notes

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  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/52084