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    Author(s): Ned B. Klopfenstein; Eric W. I. Pitman; John W. Hanna; Phil G. Cannon; Jane E. Stewart; Norio Sahashi; Yuko Ota; Tsutomu Hattori; Mitsuteru Akiba; Louise Shuey; Robert L. Schlub; Fred Brooks; Ndeme Atibalentja; Alvin M. C. Tang; Regent Y. C. Lam; Mike W. K. Leung; L. M. Chu; H. S. Kwan; Mohd Farid bin Ahmad; Su See Lee; Hsin-Han Lee; Jyh-Nong Tsai; Yu-Ching Huang; Chia-Lin Chung; Ruey-Fen Liou; Mee-Sook Kim
    Date: 2016
    Source: In: Ramsey, Amy; Palacios, Patsy, comps. Proceedings of the 63rd Annual Western International Forest Disease Work Conference; September 21-25, 2015; Newport, OR. Olympia, WA: Washington Department of Natural Resources; Logan, UT: Utah State University, Quinney College of Natural Resources. p. 137-139.
    Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (1.0 MB)

    Description

    Phellinus noxius, the cause of brown root-rot disease, is an invasive pathogen that was first described by Corner in Singapore (Corner 1932). It has a wide host range of primarily woody plants representing over 200 species from diverse families (Ann et al. 2002). This pathogen is also widespread, and has been reported to occur in many tropical/subtropical areas of Asia, Australia, Central America, Africa, and Oceania, where it can be quite destructive. Phellinus noxius appears to attack hosts regardless of health condition, and it can survive in organic matter long after host death. Early symptoms of brown root-rot disease are similar to other root diseases, including leaf chlorosis, wilt, and branch dieback; however, mortality can occur relatively quickly after infection (Sashashi et al. 2012). A prominent sign of brown root-rot disease is a dark brown or blackish mycelial crust covering the stem base and root collar (Figure IA). The associated wood decay typically displays honeycomb-shaped zone lines of reddish-brown to black (Figure lB). The pathogen is often spread via root-to-root contact, but dispersal via basidiospores is also possible.

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    Citation

    Klopfenstein, Ned B.; Pitman, Eric W. I.; Hanna, John W.; Cannon, Phil G.; Stewart, Jane E.; Sahashi, Norio; Ota, Yuko; Hattori, Tsutomu; Akiba, Mitsuteru; Shuey, Louise; Schlub, Robert L.; Brooks, Fred; Atibalentja, Ndeme; Tang, Alvin M. C.; Lam, Regent Y. C.; Leung, Mike W. K.; Chu, L. M.; Kwan, H. S.; Farid bin Ahmad, Mohd; Lee, Su See; Lee, Hsin-Han; Tsai, Jyh-Nong; Huang, Yu-Ching; Chung, Chia-Lin; Liou, Ruey-Fen; Kim, Mee-Sook. 2016. A preliminary bioclimatic approach to predicting potential distribution of Phellinus noxious and geographical areas at risk from invasion. In: Ramsey, Amy; Palacios, Patsy, comps. Proceedings of the 63rd Annual Western International Forest Disease Work Conference; September 21-25, 2015; Newport, OR. Olympia, WA: Washington Department of Natural Resources; Logan, UT: Utah State University, Quinney College of Natural Resources. p. 137-139.

    Keywords

    forest disease, Phellinus noxious, root-rot disease, invasion

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