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    Author(s): Phil G. Cannon; Ned B. KlopfensteinMee-Sook Kim; Yuko Ota; Norio Sahashi; Robert L. Schlub; Gibson Santos; Rodasio Samuel; Francis Ruegorong; Maxson Nithan; Blair Charley; Erick Waguk; Roland Quitugua; Ashley Lehman; Konrad Engleberger; Victor Guerrero; Sid Cabrerra; Manny Tenorio; Arnold Route
    Date: 2014
    Source: In: Cannon, Phil. 2014. Forest pathology in Yap, Palau, Pohnpei, Kosrae, Guam and Saipan, Sept. 2013. Trip Report. Vallejo, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Region 5, Forest Health Protection. p. 50-71.
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (1.0 MB)

    Description

    Phellinus noxius has a reputation of being an aggressive root rot pathogen on many forest tree species in parts of Southeast Asia and its symptoms and signs have been well documented. Previous reports from Micronesia indicated that this fungal pathogen is responsible for considerable damage in Saipan and likely present in Kosrae and Pohnpei. In this present report, an initial survey was conducted on selected islands of Micronesia (Yap, Palau, Pohnpei, Kosrae, Guam and Saipan) to determine if P. noxius was present and to determine its relative abundance. Preliminary observations indicate that P. noxius is infrequent on Yap and Palau, common on Saipan and Kosrae, and occasional in Pohnpei. Guam was the only island surveyed where P. noxius was not found during our survey; however, it has since been reported by collaborators in late 2013 on diverse hosts in native limestone forests (Robert Schlub, personal observation). Collections of the mycelial crust, fruiting bodies, and infected wood were made at every location where P. noxius was found on this survey trip. Fungal isolates were established in culture for species identification using DNA-based methods. The P. noxius isolates will also be used for genetic analyses using genetic markers to examine genetic diversity, potential origin, and potential pathway of spread for this fungus. Additional surveys are planned and disease management options for P. noxius are under consideration for future testing.

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    Citation

    Cannon, Phil G.; Klopfenstein, Ned B.; Kim, Mee-Sook; Ota, Yuko; Sahashi, Norio; Schlub, Robert L.; Santos, Gibson; Samuel, Rodasio; Ruegorong, Francis; Nithan, Maxson; Charley, Blair; Waguk, Erick; Quitugua, Roland; Lehman, Ashley; Engleberger, Konrad; Guerrero, Victor; Cabrerra, Sid; Tenorio, Manny; Route, Arnold. 2014. Phellinus noxius in Guam, Saipan, Yap, Palau, Pohnpei and Kosrae [Chapter IV]. In: Cannon, Phil. 2014. Forest pathology in Yap, Palau, Pohnpei, Kosrae, Guam and Saipan, Sept. 2013. Trip Report. Vallejo, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Region 5, Forest Health Protection. p. 50-71.

    Keywords

    forest pathology, Phellinus noxious, root rot

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