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A prototype application of state and transition simulation modeling in support of grassland management

Author(s):

Leonardo Frid
David Augustine
Justin Derner

Year:

2016

Publication type:

Paper (invited, offered, keynote)

Primary Station(s):

Rocky Mountain Research Station

Source:

In: Iwaasa, Alan; Lardner, H. A. (Bart); Schellenberg, Mike; Willms, Walter; Larson, Kathy, eds. Proceedings of the 10th International Rangelands Congress: The Future Management of Grazing and Wild Lands in a High-Tech World; 16-22 July, 2016; Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. The International Rangeland Congress. p. 1105-1107.

Description

The Great Plains grasslands of North America provide a multitude of ecosystem services including clean water, forage, habitat, recreation, and pollination of native and agricultural plants. A general lack of quantitative information regarding the effects of varied management strategies on these spatially heterogeneous landscapes complicates our understanding of the processes within them. Given the paucity of studies in the western Great Plains, it is difficult to quantify the interaction of environmental (e.g. drought) influences and managerial strategies, such as grazing intensity and seasonality or fire frequency and behavior. This presents unique challenges to managers seeking to understand, explain, and justify desired management strategies.

Citation

Reeves, Matt; Ford, Paulette; Frid, Leonardo; Augustine, David; Derner, Justin. 2016. A prototype application of state and transition simulation modeling in support of grassland management. In: Iwaasa, Alan; Lardner, H. A. (Bart); Schellenberg, Mike; Willms, Walter; Larson, Kathy, eds. Proceedings of the 10th International Rangelands Congress: The Future Management of Grazing and Wild Lands in a High-Tech World; 16-22 July, 2016; Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. The International Rangeland Congress. p. 1105-1107.

Publication Notes

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/52276