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    Author(s): Scott Stoleson; Linda Ordiway; Emily H. Thomas; Donald Watts
    Date: 2016
    Source: North American Bird Bander. 41(2): 57-61.
    Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
    Station: Northern Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (1.0 MB)

    Description

    Mist-netting of birds is a well-established and much used method for capturing birds for banding, taking blood, feather, or tissue samples, attaching radio transmitters or light-sensitive geolocators, and other purposes (Karr 1981, Dunn and Ralph 2004). Mistnets are typically ground based, with individual nets stretched between poles and extending 2.6 m high. Captures in ground-based mist-nets tend to be biased against canopy-dwelling species; however, (Pagen et al. 2002, Mallory et al. 2004) to compensate for this bias, numerous bird and bat researchers have developed methods to get nets higher into forest canopies.

    Publication Notes

    • Check the Northern Research Station web site to request a printed copy of this publication.
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    • Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
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    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    ​Stoleson, Scott H.; Ordiway, Linda; Thomas, Emily H.; Watts, Donald. 2016. A mobile target-netting technique for canopy birds. North American Bird Bander. 41(2): 57-61.

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