Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): S Lynch; R Cobb; D. Rizzo
    Date: 2009
    Source: In: Goheen, E.M.; Frankel, S.J., tech. coords. Proceedings of the fourth meeting of the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) Working Party S07.02.09: Phytophthoras in forests and natural ecosystems. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-221. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 296-302
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (173.0 KB)

    Description

    Pathogen epidemiology, community ecology of host species, and land use history all play major roles in the current distribution of Phytophthora ramorum and the extent of damage this pathogen has caused in California forests (Rizzo and others 2005, Meentemeyer and others 2008b). Research on the community ecology and the interaction of community composition and disease intensity will help enable synthesis of management actions at the stand level and reduce rates of infection, mortality, and fuel accumulation. Disease and mortality of tanoak (Lithocarpus densiflorus) are patchy across California landscapes, and causative mechanisms for these patterns likely operate at different spatial and temporal scales. Theoretical and empirical models that reflect the interdependences of vegetation and pathogen ecology are important to identify high-risk stands and developing management practices to reduce disease impacts.

    In this study, we assess the ecological characteristics of redwood forests to understand impacts by P. ramorum on redwood-tanoak forests in California. Since 2002, we have monitored the survival of 5769 trees in the central and southern parts of the distribution of redwood forests (Maloney and others 2005). Using this dataset, we have asked the following questions: How does variation of host community structure affect the frequency of infection and mortality due to P. ramorum? What are the ecological relationships which structure these vegetation types? We address these questions by examining relationships between species biomass and edaphic factors. We then use preexisting host community structure to explore extent of P. ramorum infection and resulting mortality across the main area of infestation.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to psw_communications@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Lynch, S; Cobb, R; Rizzo, D. 2009. Vegetation dynamics and impacts of Phytophthora ramorum in redwood-tanoak forests in California. In: Goheen, E.M.; Frankel, S.J., tech. coords. Proceedings of the fourth meeting of the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) Working Party S07.02.09: Phytophthoras in forests and natural ecosystems. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-221. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 296-302.

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/52954