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    Author(s): John M. Kabrick; David R. Larsen; Stephen R. Shifley
    Date: 1997
    Source: In: Brookshire, Brian L. Shifley, Stephen R., eds. Proceedings of the Missouri Ozark Forest Ecosystem Project Symposium: an experimental approach to landscape research; 1997 June 3-5; St. Louis, MO. General Technical Report NC-193. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station: 150-168.
    Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
    Station: Northern Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (916.0 KB)

    Description

    We conducted a study to identify pre-treatment trends in woody species density, diameter, and basal area among MOFEP sites, blocks, and treatment areas; relate woody species differences among sites, blocks, and treatment areas to differences in environmental conditions; and identify potential treatment response differences based upon our fmdings. Sites 2 through 5 had greater numbers of species per unit area. Sites 7 and 8 had fewer trees ≥ 4 cm diameter, less white oak, and more scarlet oak. Block 3 had fewer trees ≥ 11 cm, less overall basal area, and less white oak. Block 2 had less black oak. There were no treatment-level woody vegetation differences. Greater numbers of species per acre, greater abundance of white oak, and lesser abundance of scarlet oak were associated with sites and blocks that have a greater proportion of base-rich geological strata and a greater proportion of soils classified as Alfisols. We hypothesize: (1) no-harvest (NH) and uneven-aged management (UAM) treatment responses will be more variable and more difficult to interpret than even-aged management treatment responses (EAM) because NH and UAM treatments were delegated to more contrasting sites and (2) EAM treatment areas will have greater growth rates because these treatments were delegated to sites having siltier surface soil textures and a greater proportion of base-rich parent materials. The designated blocks were effective in grouping sites with similar vegetational characteristics. However, based on an examination of environmental characteristics, blocks that combined sites 1, 7, and 8; sites 3, 4, and 5; and sites 2, 6, and 9 may improve blocking effectiveness.

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    Citation

    Kabrick, John M.; Larsen, David R.; Shifley, Stephen R. 1997. Analysis of Pre-treatment Woody Vegetation and Environmental Data for the Missouri Ozark Forest Ecosystem Project. In: Brookshire, Brian L. Shifley, Stephen R., eds. Proceedings of the Missouri Ozark Forest Ecosystem Project Symposium: an experimental approach to landscape research; 1997 June 3-5; St. Louis, MO. General Technical Report NC-193. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station: 150-168.

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