Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Grant T. KirkerSamuel L. Zelinka; Leandro Passarini
    Date: 2016
    Source: 2016 Proceedings of the American Wood Protection Association. American Wood Protection Association: 179-185.
    Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
    Station: Forest Products Laboratory
    PDF: Download Publication  (2.0 MB)

    Description

    Salt damage is a frequent problem in wood exposed to seawater and other saline environments. Symptoms of salt damage are often referred to as fuzzy wood and have been historically considered non-structural damage, but a growing number of customer inquiries have prompted a re-evaluation of this phenomenon. This paper details several case studies involving salt damage, discusses current knowledge on the underlying mechanisms and highlights on-going work at the Forest Products Laboratory to investigate the causes and effects of salt on wood. A better understanding of the salt damage process will eventually lead to remedial treatment options.

    Publication Notes

    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Kirker, Grant T.; Zelinka, Samuel L.; Passarini, Leandro. 2016. Avast Ye Salty Dogs: Salt damage in the context of coastal residential construction and historical maritime timbers. In: 2016 Proceedings of the American Wood Protection Association. American Wood Protection Association: 179-185.

    Keywords

    Salt damage, tracheid defibration, coastal construction, historic ships, wood preservation

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/53860