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    Author(s): Christina Rosa; Paolo Margaria; Scott M. Geib; Erin D. Scully
    Date: 2017
    Source: In: Pinchot, Cornelia C.; Knight, Kathleen S.; Haugen, Linda M.; Flower, Charles E.; Slavicek, James M., eds. Proceedings of the American elm restoration workshop 2016; 2016 October 25-27; Lewis Center, OH. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-174. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 49-67.
    Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
    Station: Northern Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (415.0 KB)

    Description

    In North America, American elms were historically present throughout the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada. The longevity of these trees, their resistance to the harsh urban environment, and their aesthetics led to their wide use in landscaping and streetscaping over several decades. American elms were one of most cultivated plants in the United States until the arrival of Dutch elm disease (DED) and elm yellows disease (EY). EY epidemics have killed large numbers of elm trees in the northeastern United States beginning in the 1940s. Since then, the disease has gradually been spreading to the southern and western regions of the United States while remaining endemic in the Northeast. Today EY, together with DED, is responsible for the death of most of the American species of elm trees, including (Ulmus americana (L.), U. rubra (Muh.), U. alata (Michx.), U. crassifolia (Nutt.) U. serotina (Sarg)) and of some of their natural hybrids (i.e. U. pumila × rubra). We performed next-generation sequencing on EY-infected elm trees to discover EY effector genes involved in plant-phytoplasma interactions and to survey the metagenome of the infected elms. This research is a basic step to understand how EY infection shapes the elm microbial communities and, in the long term, will lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of EY infection in elm and the interactions between EY and its leafhopper vectors.

    Publication Notes

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    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Rosa, Christina; Margaria, Paolo; Geib, Scott M.; Scully, Erin D. 2017. Novel insights into the elm yellows phytoplasma genome and into the metagenome of elm yellows-infected elms. In: Pinchot, Cornelia C.; Knight, Kathleen S.; Haugen, Linda M.; Flower, Charles E.; Slavicek, James M., eds. Proceedings of the American elm restoration workshop 2016; 2016 October 25-27; Lewis Center, OH. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-174. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 49-67.

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/54943