Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): A.W. Schoettle
    Date: 2017
    Source: Gene conservation of tree species—banking on the future. Proceedings of a workshop. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-963. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. p. 95.
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Northwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (32.0 KB)

    Description

    Pinus aristata, Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine, has a narrow geographic and elevational distribution and is threatened by rapid climate change, the introduced pathogen Cronartium ribicola that causes white pine blister rust (WPBR), and bark beetles. The core distribution of P. aristata is near and at treeline in central and southern Colorado and extends into northern New Mexico with a disjunct population in northern Arizona. The combination of low genetic diversity, moderate population isolation, and a protracted regeneration dynamic puts populations at risk for extirpation by novel stresses highlighting the need for ex situ gene conservation.
    Populations range-wide are still healthy and offer the opportunity to sample the genetic diversity of the species. An efficient range-wide gene conservation sampling design of seed and tissue was developed and executed. Ten populations within each of six collection areas corresponding to the observed genetic substructuring were identified; 10 individual tree seed collections and a bulk collection were targeted from each of the 60 populations. Sample trees are georeferenced and sampled for seed and needle tissue; each stored for a working collection and gene conservation at -18 oC. Ecological data (physical site characteristics, stand density, species composition, disturbance history, regeneration capacity) on each population complement the genetic collection. The collection has been used to assess geographic and source-climate variation in genetic disease resistance to WPBR and other adaptive traits. The collection serves (1) to guide further collections and support proactive planting efforts to increase population resilience in the field and (2) to provide conservation and research material of the range-wide diversity for the species before constriction due to directional selection by climate change and WPBR. More details can be found in: Schoettle, A.W.; Coop, J.D. 2017. Range-wide conservation of Pinus aristata: a genetic collection with ecological context for proactive management today and resources for tomorrow. New Forests. 48(2): 181–199. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11056-017-9570-z.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to pnw_pnwpubs@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Schoettle, A.W. 2017. Gene conservation of Pinus aristata: a collection with ecological context for management today and resources for tomorrow. In: Sniezko, Richard A.; Man, Gary; Hipkins, Valerie; Woeste, Keith; Gwaze, David; Kliejunas, John T.; McTeague, Brianna A., tech. cords. 2017. Gene conservation of tree species—banking on the future. Proceedings of a workshop. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-963. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. p. 95.

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/55093