Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): N.A. Gerlowski; M.A. Muñiz-Castro
    Date: 2017
    Source: In: Sniezko, Richard A.; Man, Gary; Hipkins, Valerie; Woeste, Keith; Gwaze, David; Kliejunas, John T.; McTeague, Brianna A., tech. cords. 2017. Gene conservation of tree species—banking on the future. Proceedings of a workshop. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-963. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. p. 126.
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Northwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (42.0 KB)

    Description

    Mexico is both an oak (Quercus) biodiversity hotspot (over 160 described species) and the western hemisphere's leader in magnolia (Magnolia) diversity (36 described species). In the face of myriad threats to these groups, including climate change, habitat loss/fragmentation, overharvesting, and plant pests/pathogens, the imperative to preserve the genetic diversity of these trees has become a high priority of the Vallarta Botanical Garden (VBG). In collaboration with researchers from the University of Guadalajara, the VBG has several new initiatives underway to acquire diverse and well-documented plant materials from these taxa. Their goals are the enhancement of the ex-situ collections of the VBG and to continue to research and monitor in-situ populations. Because Quercus and Magnolia seeds are recalcitrant, ex-situ collection is currently the most viable strategy to safeguard the genetic diversity of these trees beyond their native distribution, which in the tropics is often limited to very small and vulnerable stretches of forest.
    The VBG is also trialing and documenting successful horticultural practices to launch satellite community collections in both rural and urban landscapes. These efforts seek to multiply the overall potential ex-situ collection holdings and to engage local communities in the importance of protecting their forests and the valuable resources they harbor. While the United States is rich in botanical gardens with strong conservation programs, their southern neighbor boasts a greater floristic biodiversity (roughly 26,000 species of vascular plants in Mexico compared to approximately 17,000 in the United States) over a much more concentrated landmass (about 1/5 the size), and has few gardens with active conservation programs beyond their grounds. United States gardens with missions to conserve threatened tree species regardless of geopolitical boundaries have incredible opportunities to collaborate with counterparts south of the border to realize their objectives. Since many conservation programs in Mexican gardens are in their formative stages, there are also ample opportunities for advising these institutions' strategies for the best chance of success.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to pnw_pnwpubs@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Gerlowski, N.A.; Muñiz-Castro, M.A. 2017. The Vallarta Botanical Garden's advancements in conserving the diversity of native Mexican oaks and magnolias. In: Sniezko, Richard A.; Man, Gary; Hipkins, Valerie; Woeste, Keith; Gwaze, David; Kliejunas, John T.; McTeague, Brianna A., tech. cords. 2017. Gene conservation of tree species—banking on the future. Proceedings of a workshop. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-963. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. p. 126.

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/55102