Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): C.Z. Quiñones-Pérez; C. Wehenkel
    Date: 2017
    Source: In: Sniezko, Richard A.; Man, Gary; Hipkins, Valerie; Woeste, Keith; Gwaze, David; Kliejunas, John T.; McTeague, Brianna A., tech. cords. 2017. Gene conservation of tree species—banking on the future. Proceedings of a workshop. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-963. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. p. 201.
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Northwest Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (55.0 KB)

    Description

    Picea chihuahuana is an endemic species in Mexico and is considered endangered, according to the Mexican Official Norm (NOM-ECOL-059-2010). This species covers a total area of no more than 300 ha located in at least 40 sites along the Sierra Madre Occidental in Durango and Chihuahua states. A minimum of 42,600 individuals has been estimated, although the number of mature individuals is uncertain and could be less than 2,500. The size of the populations varies from 21 to 5,546 individuals, including trees, saplings, and seedlings. Theory suggests that small populations can be more susceptible to loss of genetic variability due to genetic drift, inbreeding depression and strong unidirectional selection. The predicted result is the total loss of genetically distinct populations, the loss of alleles or change in frequency of specific alleles within populations or over the species as a whole, or the loss of allelic combinations. Therefore, the principal aim of the present study was to determine genetic erosion in 14 populations of P. chihuahuana by comparing the genetic diversity among trees sorted into diameter classes (as a substitute variable for age classes). Needles were sampled from about 700 randomly chosen individuals of P. chihuahuana from these 14 populations, and genetic data were obtained through AFLP technology. In order to determine genetic erosion, the genetic diversity was quantified by measuring mean total differentiation (δT), the proportion of polymorphic fragments (prpoly), DW (a parameter to quantify rare markers within cohorts), and genetic distance using GenAlEx 6.5. Finally, a two-sided permutation test was performed for the observed degrees of covariation (C). If the value of C is positive and P (Z ≥C) is statistically significant (i.e., P <0.025; two-sided permutation test), we can assume that genetic erosion has occurred in a defined area.

    Publication Notes

    • Visit PNW's Publication Request Page to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Quiñones-Pérez, C.Z.; Wehenkel, C. 2017. Determining genetic erosion in fourteen Picea chihuahuana Martínez populations. In: Sniezko, Richard A.; Man, Gary; Hipkins, Valerie; Woeste, Keith; Gwaze, David; Kliejunas, John T.; McTeague, Brianna A., tech. cords. 2017. Gene conservation of tree species—banking on the future. Proceedings of a workshop. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-963. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. p. 201.

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/55142