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    Author(s): Dave Helweg; Christian Giardina
    Date: 2017
    Source: University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) Integration & Application Network Newsletter 581
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (5.0 MB)

    Description

    The Hawaiian Islands are among the most isolated and recently inhabited places on Earth. Discovered by Polynesian voyagers some 1000 years ago, people arrived to find unique wildlife and plants arrayed across a remarkable range of ecosystems. Polynesian settlers relied on traditional methods to cultivate canoe crops across the wide range of climate and soils. Early Hawaiian societies adapted to regular climate variations, including periods of extreme drought. Today, as drought events become more severe, contemporary communities must also learn to adapt.

    Publication Notes

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    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Helweg, Dave; Giardina, Christian. 2017. Ecological drought in the Hawaiian Islands: unique tropical systems are vulnerable to drought. University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) Integration & Application Network Newsletter 581. 4p.

    Keywords

    Drought, Hawaii, water resources, services

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