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    Author(s): Sheel BansalLeslie BrodieSharon StantonKaren WaddellMarin PalmerGlenn Christensen; Olaf Kuegler; John ChaseJoel ThompsonSarah JovanAndrew Gray; Morgan Todd
    Date: 2017
    Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-958. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 130 p.
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Northwest Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (0 B)

    Description

    This report highlights key findings from a comprehensive vegetation survey of all forested land across the state of Oregon. A total of 5,180 forested field plots in Oregon were visited by Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) crews over a 10-year period from 2001 to 2010. Oregon has 30 million acres of forest, covering nearly half the state. The structure and composition of Oregon’s forests differ considerably across the state, particularly east versus west of the Cascade Range. Western Oregon forests are dominated by higher productivity classes (85 to 224 cubic feet per acre annual growth) and are composed of Douglas-fir and western hemlock, while forests in the east typically exhibit lower productivity (0 to 84 cubic feet per acre annual growth) and are composed of ponderosa pine, western juniper, and lodgepole pine. The Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management administer the majority of forested land in Oregon; these public forests managed by federal agencies tend to have older, larger trees. Private owners, both corporate and noncorporate, own nearly half of the forested land in western Oregon, particularly in areas of high productivity. Understory vegetation in Oregon forests is more abundant in younger, moist forests. Non-native species are present in many of Oregon’s forests, most notably cheatgrass in the east and Himalayan blackberry in the west. This report includes estimates of forest growth, removals, and mortality for ownership groups across the state. The FIA program will continue to revisit and remeasure all the field plots over 10 years to report on changes in Oregon’s forest resources.

    Supplemental Download

    Oregon’s Forest Resources, 2001-2010: Online Supplement to Ten Year Forest Inventory and Analysis Report


     

    Publication Notes

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    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Bansal, Sheel; Brodie, Leslie; Stanton, Sharon; Waddell, Karen; Palmer, Marin; Christensen, Glenn; Kuegler, Olaf. 2017. Oregon’s forest resources, 2001–2010: ten-year Forest Inventory and Analysis report. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-958. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 130 p.

    Keywords

    Air pollution, biomass, carbon, dead wood, Douglas-fir, fire, forest land, insects, invasive plants, inventory, timber volume, timberland, Oregon.

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