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    Author(s): W.J. Libby
    Date: 2017
    Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-258. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 423-427
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (133.0 KB)

    Description

    Models predicting future climates and other kinds of information are being developed to anticipate where these two species may fail, where they may continue to thrive, and where they may colonize, given changes in climate and other elements of the environment. Important elements of such predictions, among others, are: photoperiod; site qualities; changes in levels and yearly patterns of temperature, wind, fog and precipitation; the effects of these on interactions with other biota at each site; the effects of changes in fire frequency and intensity; the availability of seeds and seed vectors; and the effects of human activity. Examples are presented, with focus on fire and human activity. Natural migration may need assistance. Establishing groves far from the native ranges is advocated.

    Publication Notes

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    Citation

    Libby, W.J. 2017. Why are coast redwood and giant sequoia not where they are not? In: Standiford, Richard B.; Valachovic, Yana, tech cords. Coast redwood science symposium—2016: Past successes and future direction. Proceedings of a workshop. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-258. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 423-427.

    Keywords

    assisted colonization, assisted migration, climate change, fire, Sequoia, Sequoiadendron

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