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    Author(s): J. E. Stewart; N. Sahashi; T. Hattori; M. Akiba; Y. Ota; L. Shuey; R. L. Schlub; N. Atibalentia; F. Brooks; A. M. C. Tang; R. Y. C. Lam; M. W. K. Leung; L. M. Chu; H. S. Kwan; A. Mohd Farid; S. S. Lee; C. -L. Chung; H. -H. Lee; Y.- C. Huang; R. -F. Liou; J. -N. Tsai; P. G. Cannon; J. W. HannaN. B. Klopfenstein; M. -S. Kim
    Date: 2017
    Source: In: Goodrich, Betsy; Palacios, Patsy, comps. Proceedings of the 64th Annual Western International Forest Disease Work Conference; 9-13 May 2016; Sitka, AK. p. 143-147.
    Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (268.0 KB)

    Description

    Phellinus noxius (Corner) G. H. Cunn is a vastly destructive, fast-growing pathogen that affects a wide range of woody hosts in pan-tropical areas, including Asia, Australia, Africa, and Oceania (Ann et al. 2002). This invasive pathogen causes brown root-rot disease on cacao, coffee, and rubber, as well as diverse fruit, nut, ornamental, and other native/exotic trees, and little host specificity is known to occur (Sahashi et al. 2010). Symptoms of P. noxius infection can include reduced tree growth, defoliation, and branch dieback; however, P. noxius can also survive as a saprophyte by colonizing the heart wood and other organic matter. Brown root-rot disease can develop over several years, or in some cases, P. noxius infection can cause tree mortality within a year. Understanding the genetic diversity and evolutional history of P. noxius populations worldwide well help assess the evolutionary origins, worldwide movement, and potential ecological differences within P. noxius, which will contribute to the development of management strategies. Our objective was to understand the genetic diversity and evolutional history of P. noxius populations worldwide to assess the evolutionary origins, worldwide movement, and potential ecological differences within populations of P. noxius.

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    Citation

    Stewart, J. E.; Sahashi, N.; Hattori, T.; Akiba, M.; Ota, Y.; Shuey, L.; Schlub, R. L.; Atibalentia, N.; Brooks, F.; Tang, A. M. C.; Lam, R. Y. C.; Leung, M. W. K.; Chu, L. M.; Kwan, H. S.; Farid, A. Mohd; Lee, S. S.; Chung, C. -L.; Lee, H. -H.; Huang, Y.- C.; Liou, R. -F.; Tsai, J. -N.; Cannon, P. G.; Hanna, J. W.; Klopfenstein, N. B.; Kim, M. -S. 2017. Phylogenetic and population analyses of the invasive brown root-rot pathogen (Phellinus noxius) highlight the existence of at least two distinct populations. In: Goodrich, Betsy; Palacios, Patsy, comps. Proceedings of the 64th Annual Western International Forest Disease Work Conference; 9-13 May 2016; Sitka, AK. p. 143-147.

    Keywords

    brown root-rot pathogen, Phellinus noxious, invasive, genetic diversity

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