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    Author(s): N.T. Mirov; C.J. Kraebel
    Date: 1937
    Source: Res. Note 18. Berkeley, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, California Forest and Range Experiment Station. 27 p.
    Publication Series: Research Note (RN)
    PDF: Download Publication  (8.0 MB)

    Description

    Not long ago the object of forestry was pretty generally considered to be the growing of timber, and forest planting was concerned almost exclusively with the planting of lumber producing trees. The text-books, it is true, have given increasing attention to the part played by ground-cover vegetation in forest ecology, but these discussions have rarely suggested the actual cultivation of such plants. Gradually, and with rapid acceleration in recent years, the concept of forestry has broadened to keep pace with a growing recognition of the importance of other uses of the forest, such as grazing, recreation, streamflow regulation, erosion control and even the preservation of scenic beauty.

    Publication Notes

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    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Mirov, N.T.; Kraebel, C.J. 1937. Collecting and propagating the seeds of California wild plants. Res. Note 18. Berkeley, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, California Forest and Range Experiment Station. 27 p.

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