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Optimizing biomass feedstock logistics for forest residue processing and transportation on a tree-shaped road network

Author(s):

Hee Han
Woodam Chung
Lucas Wells

Year:

2018

Publication type:

Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Primary Station(s):

Rocky Mountain Research Station

Source:

Forests. 9: 121.

Description

An important task in forest residue recovery operations is to select the most cost-efficient feedstock logistics system for a given distribution of residue piles, road access, and available machinery. Notable considerations include inaccessibility of treatment units to large chip vans and frequent, long-distance mobilization of forestry equipment required to process dispersed residues. In this study, we present optimized biomass feedstock logistics on a tree-shaped road network that take into account the following options: (1) grinding residues at the site of treatment and forwarding ground residues either directly to bioenergy facility or to a concentration yard where they are transshipped to large chip vans, (2) forwarding residues to a concentration yard where they are stored and ground directly into chip vans, and (3) forwarding residues to a nearby grinder location and forwarding the ground materials. A mixed-integer programming model coupled with a network algorithm was developed to solve the problem. The model was applied to recovery operations on a study site in Colorado, USA, and the optimal solution reduced the cost of logistics up to 11% compared to the conventional system. This is an important result because this cost reduction propagates downstream through the biomass supply chain, reducing production costs for bioenergy and bioproducts.

Citation

Han, Hee; Chung, Woodam; Wells, Lucas; Anderson, Nathaniel. 2018. Optimizing biomass feedstock logistics for forest residue processing and transportation on a tree-shaped road network. Forests. 9: 121.

Cited

Publication Notes

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/55857