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    Author(s): John W. Coulston
    Date: 2007
    Source: In: Forest health monitoring: 2005 national technical report. General Technical Report SRS-104. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station.
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Southern Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (726.0 KB)

    Description

    Why Is Fire Important? Fire is a powerful, selective regulatory mechanism in forest ecosystems. It is a natural part of the environment, and fireaffected ecosystems depend on a particular frequency and intensity of fire. These ecosystems will remain in their natural state only if the fire regime to which they are adapted is present (Kimmins 1987). The frequency and intensity of burning depends on the buildup of fuels, weather conditions, management activities, and the occurrence of ignition sources. Fire
    frequency and intensity have been significantly altered on approximately 15 percent of the forested area in the conterminous United States (Schmidt and others 2002). Wildland fires in these areas can have significant economic and ecological impacts.

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    Citation

    Coulston, John W. 2007. Fire occurence (2004). In: Forest health monitoring: 2005 national technical report. General Technical Report SRS-104. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. (pages 23-26)

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