Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub

    Description

    Why Are Down Woody Materials Important? The down woody materials (DWM) indicator is used to estimate the quantity of dead
    organic material (resulting from plant mortality and leaf turnover) in forest ecosystems of the United States. The DWM indicator, coupled with other components of the enhanced Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program, can indicate the current status of
    fuels, carbon pools, and wildlife habitat of our nation’s forest ecosystems. The fine and coarse woody components of the DWM indicator are specifically designed to match the components defined by the National Fire Danger Rating System. Use of the DWM indicator may increase the precision of carbon pool estimates across the United States. Additionally, the coarse woody debris (CWD) component of DWM may indicate the condition of habitat critical for numerous plants and animals.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to pubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Woodall, Christopher W. 2007. Down woody materials as an indicator of wildlife habitat, fuels, and carbon stocks of the United States. In: Forest health monitoring: 2005 national technical report. General Technical Report SRS-104. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pages (41-50)

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/55884