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    Author(s): Kevin S. McKelvey; Polly C. Buotte
    Date: 2018
    Source: In: Halofsky, Jessica E.; Peterson, David L.; Dante-Wood, S. Karen; Hoang, Linh; Ho, Joanne J.; Joyce, Linda A., eds. Climate change vulnerability and adaptation in the Northern Rocky Mountains [Part 2]. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-374. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 353-397.
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (734.0 KB)

    Description

    Temperature and moisture affect organisms through their operational environment and the thin boundary layer immediately above their tissues, and these effects are measured at short time scales. When a human (a mammal) wearing a dark insulative layer walks outdoors on a cold but sunny day, he or she feels warm because energy from the sun is interacting with the dark clothing, creating a warm boundary layer to which his or her body reacts. Conditions beyond that thin boundary layer are physiologically irrelevant. Walk into the shade, and suddenly one is cold because the warm boundary layer has been replaced with one at the ambient temperature of the air. This example demonstrates many factors to consider when evaluating the degree to which a change in climate will affect an organism. Climate is defined as the long-term average of temperature, precipitation, and wind velocity. “Long term,” when applied to climate, is a relative term and can refer to periods of weeks to centuries. In the context of climate models, results are generally reported as averages across 30-year intervals, which for many animal species represent multiple generations. Our ability to infer the biological effects of projected long-term changes in temperature and precipitation relies both on our ability to directly relate these multiyear averages to biological responses, and the trophic distance between climate-induced ecological change and its effects on specific biological relationships.

    Publication Notes

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    Citation

    McKelvey, Kevin S.; Buotte, Polly C. 2018. Climate Change and Wildlife in the Northern Rockies Region [Chapter 9]. In: Halofsky, Jessica E.; Peterson, David L.; Dante-Wood, S. Karen; Hoang, Linh; Ho, Joanne J.; Joyce, Linda A., eds. Climate change vulnerability and adaptation in the Northern Rocky Mountains [Part 2]. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-374. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 353-397.

    Keywords

    adaptation, climate change, ecological disturbance, climate-smart resource management, Northern Rocky Mountains, vulnerability assessment

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/55994