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    Author(s): Russell T. GrahamJonalea R. TonnTheresa B. Jain
    Date: 1994
    Source: In: Baumgartner, David M.; Lotan, James E.; Tonn, Jonalea R., eds. Interior cedar-hemlock-white pine forests: ecology and management: Symposium proceedings; 1993 March 2-4; Spokane, WA. Pullman, WA: Washington State University. p. 357-362.
    Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (3.0 MB)

    Description

    Western white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl. ex D. Don) continues to be one of the most important coniferous tree species growing in Northern Rocky Mountain forests. Because large wildfires occurred early in the 1900s, many plantations of western white pine with varying levels of resistance to blister rust (Cronartium ribicola Fisch.) were established. Thinning these stands cannot only produce high value lumber products, but can maintain other resource values important to sustaining forest ecosystems. In 1982, a 53-year-old western white pine plantation was thinned to three different spacings, one portion was clearcut, and one portion remained as an untreated control using a randomized complete block experimental design. Ten years after treatment, except for trees in the widest spacing, diameter growth response was minimal. Up to 20,000 western white pine regenerated per acre (49,421/ha) in the thinnings. Even if only a small portion (i.e., 5%) of these seedlings were rust-resistant, the future stand will be well stocked. Western white pine regeneration in the clearcut exceeded 5,500 trees per acre (13,591 /ha) and were the tallest found in any of the treatments. If the stands initiated by the thinnings are allowed to develop, they will have a variety of structures and attributes ranging from large trees, snags, and downed-logs, to high-value commercial products.

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    Citation

    Graham, Russell T.; Tonn, Jonalea R.; Jain, Theresa B. 1994. Managing western white pine plantations for multiple resource objectives. In: Baumgartner, David M.; Lotan, James E.; Tonn, Jonalea R., eds. Interior cedar-hemlock-white pine forests: ecology and management: Symposium proceedings; 1993 March 2-4; Spokane, WA. Pullman, WA: Washington State University. p. 357-362.

    Keywords

    thinning, shelterwood, stand growth, wildlife, snags, blister rust, regeneration

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/56168