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    Author(s): C. Wehenkel; C. Z. Quinones-Perez; J. C. Hernandez-Díaz; C. A. Lopez-Sanchez
    Date: 2018
    Source: In: Schoettle, Anna W.; Sniezko, Richard A.; Kliejunas, John T., eds. Proceedings of the IUFRO joint conference: Genetics of five-needle pines, rusts of forest trees, and Strobusphere; 2014 June 15-20; Fort Collins, CO. Proc. RMRS-P-76. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 1-6.
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (2.0 MB)

    Description

    Extending from the Canadian province of Alberta to the Transverse Volcanic Plateau of Mexico, Pinus strobiformis is part of a species complex with two geographically adjacent, but nonsympatric, species, namely P. flexilis and P. ayacahuite. Pinus strobiformis is classified as being of least concern and at lower risk according to the guidelines of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List (IUCN 2014). In Mexico, this frequent tree species is protected and included in Mexican Regulation NOM-059-2010. Pinus strobiformis appears to have broad environmental tolerances and fire resistance when mature. It is often found in mixed-conifer forests that are valuable summer habitat for big and small game animals, rodents, and game and nongame birds. At the large scale, analyses of spatial genetic structure of P. strobiformis indicated a very weak spatial distance–genetic distance relationship, probably resulting from a strong seed interchange, likely by birds, particularly the Mexican jay (Aphelocoma wollweberi), and from a continuous and broad geographic distribution of this tree species. The highest genetic diversity was found in the southern populations, indicating the recent colonization of the populations at the northern distributional limit. Recently, interest in P. strobiformis has increased due to the discovery of white pine blister rust (causal agent: Cronartium ribicola) in the Sacramento Mountains of New Mexico (USA).

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    Citation

    Wehenkel, C.; Quinones-Perez, C. Z.; Hernandez-Díaz, J. C.; Lopez-Sanchez, C. A. 2018. Ecology and genetics of Pinus strobiformis. In: Schoettle, Anna W.; Sniezko, Richard A.; Kliejunas, John T., eds. Proceedings of the IUFRO joint conference: Genetics of five-needle pines, rusts of forest trees, and Strobusphere; 2014 June 15-20; Fort Collins, CO. Proc. RMRS-P-76. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 1-6.

    Keywords

    genetic variation, genetic conservation, restoration, Pinus, Populus, rust fungi, disease resistance, climate change, Cronartium ribicola

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/56683