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    Author(s): D. F. Tomback; L. M. Resler; G. P. Malanson; E. K. Smith-McKenna; S. C. Blakeslee; J. C. Pyatt
    Date: 2018
    Source: In: Schoettle, Anna W.; Sniezko, Richard A.; Kliejunas, John T., eds. Proceedings of the IUFRO joint conference: Genetics of five-needle pines, rusts of forest trees, and Strobusphere; 2014 June 15-20; Fort Collins, CO. Proc. RMRS-P-76. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 17.
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (204.0 KB)

    Description

    In some Rocky Mountain treeline ecotones, whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) serves as a tree island initiator more frequently than Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii) or subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa). Tree island initiation begins with a solitary krummholz tree, which provides sufficient leeward protection so that another tree may become established, resulting in a tree island. More trees may establish on the lee side over time. Whitebark pine mortality from white pine blister rust (pathogen: Cronartium ribicola) reduces opportunities for such facilitation. Will declines in whitebark pine alter treeline response to climate warming? We have surveyed various treeline communities from the Greater Yellowstone area (Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho, USA) to whitebark pine’s northern limit.

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    Citation

    Tomback, D. F.; Resler, L. M.; Malanson, G. P.; Smith-McKenna, E. K.; Blakeslee, S. C.; Pyatt, J. C. 2018. White pine blister rust alters facilitation interactions at treelike: Implications for treelike communities and response to climate change. In: Schoettle, Anna W.; Sniezko, Richard A.; Kliejunas, John T., eds. Proceedings of the IUFRO joint conference: Genetics of five-needle pines, rusts of forest trees, and Strobusphere; 2014 June 15-20; Fort Collins, CO. Proc. RMRS-P-76. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 17.

    Keywords

    genetic variation, genetic conservation, restoration, Pinus, Populus, rust fungi, disease resistance, climate change, Cronartium ribicola

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/56692